Healthy Eating and Natpro

Healthy eating and Natpro

  • Small frequent meals are often a help for blood sugar imbalances.

  • After a large meal there is a temporary drop in the level of progesterone, due to an increased metabolic clearance rate of that hormone, so symptoms can become worse for a while.

  • Food should be natural, unprocessed and if possible organic and include both protein and fibre, particularly that from green leaves.

  • As a substitute for sugar use erythritol, xylitol or stevia. Stevia is a natural extract from the plant Stevia rebaudiana, a member of the daisy family, native to Paraguay. The extract is 200-300 times sweeter than sugar, but has none of the drawbacks and does not affect blood sugar in any way. The fresh or dried leaves are easier to use and taste better than the extract.

  • Xylitol and erythritol are sugar alcohols, which look and taste like sugar, but are metabolized by the body at a much slower rate. They have respectively 2.4 and 0.0 calories per gram. They cannot be used by oral bacteria, so do not contribute to tooth decay. If used in large quantities xylitol can cause flatulence and have a laxative affect, unlike erythritol which is absorbed into the blood stream before reaching the large intestine.

Avoid:

  • sugar and artificial sweeteners

  • all foods high on the glycaemic index

  • all forms of processed foods containing sugar, refined grains, particularly wheat, in fact all foods which convert to glucose, ie all grains, starchy carbs like potatoes, sweet potatotes, yams, dried legumes, all starchy, high sugar fruits, this will lower fructosamine levels

  • preservatives, colourants, flavourants, sweeteners, especially avoid aspartame

  • carbonated drinks, including the “Max”, “Diet” and sugar free drinks

  • fruit juices

  • biscuits, cakes and white breads

  • canned foods

  • sauces

  • sweets

  • large meals

  • all forms of oestrogen

  • oxidised fats, (ie margarine, refined oils, and fried foods, in particular fried animal protein)

  • pasteurised, homogenised milk

  • alcohol and particularly stimulants containing caffeine such as coffee, black and green tea, soft drinks

  • tap water, which is now contaminated with fluoride, prescription drugs, including oestrogen from the Pill and HRT, plus the oestrogen mimics generated by industry. Drink only filtered water.

And More:

Use natural alternatives to household cleaners, which are some of the most toxic chemicals we regularly come into contact with.

Read all labels on containers, especially those for food and cosmetics. Look for natural alternatives to body care products, many contain high levels of endocrine disruptors and carcinogens, particularly the sunscreens.

Published with thanks to www.progesteronetherapy.com

Natpro Ingredients

Ingredients of Natpro


Bio-identical Natpro Natural Progesterone cream has following ingredients:

  • Each tube contains 60 grams (2 oz) of cream and 2000mg of progesterone
  • A single tube, at the minimum dose of 100mg/3ml is sufficient for 20 days – see here.
  • Natpro cream has a concentration of 3.33% progesterone or 33.33 milligrams per gram

Each tube comes with instructions

Each tube contains:

  • de-ionised water
  • caprylic/capric triglyceride (MCT Oil)
  • cetearyl olivate/sorbitan olivate
  • natural progesterone 2000mg Ph. Eur. USP JP
  • Aspen bark extract
  • vitamin E
  • dehydroxanthan gum

Please note: Natpro has an unopened shelf life of 18 months and is still valid for 6 months after the expiry date.

Natpro contains only vegetable substances. No animal has suffered or will ever suffer because of it’s production or use.

Natpro progesterone cream does not contain any toxic substances – such as growth hormones which is found in today’s animal products. It contains no parabens either i.e. grapeseed oil extract. You are protected.

The progesterone in Natpro is identical to the progesterone your body makes. ‘Progesterone Ph. Eur. USP JP’ is derived principally from stigmasterol, a steroidal sapogenin. Phytosterols are chemically similar to cholesterol which is found in animals. Cholesterol is the starting point for the hormones made naturally in animals, including humans. Plants such as the soy bean, Dioscorea species of yams, fenugreek, sisal, calabar bean, some lilies, yucca, some solanum species, maize and many more contain phytosterols, some of which are stigmasterol, diosgenin, sitosterol, campesterol, hecogenin, smilagenin, sarsasapogenin, solasodine. As these sterols have a similar molecular structure to progesterone, they are used as starting points for the synthesis of progesterone. In the southern United States the sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) is called a yam, as are some edible members of the aroids. These plants do not contain any sapogenins. Don’t confuse Natpro progesterone cream with a bean or yam “extract”. Such extracts do not contain progesterone.
caprylic/capric triglyceride – is a ‘medium chain’ triglyceride of fractionated vegetable fatty acids extracted from coconut oil. It is colourless, neutral in odour and taste and has a very low viscosity. It has very good resistance to oxidation. It is an ideal ‘carrier’ for progesterone, as it penetrates the skin readily and is easily absorbed. It does not leave a greasy film and helps to retain moisture. Very importantly… it’s not a mineral oil and is unrefined.
Let’s examine these points more closely:

Mineral oils, being petro-chemicals, are potentially harmful because they are “endochrine disruptors”. They rob your body of the oil soluble vitamins A, D, E & K, and so deprive you of vital nutrients. Never use any product on your skin that contains mineral oils.
Heating or refining any vegetable oil causes damage. The good “cis” fatty acids that are found in vegetable oils are turned into bad “trans” fatty acids and the result is highly carcinogenic. Don’t use refined oils.
Vitamin E (dl-alpha tocopherol) – All emulsions made with vegetable oils have the potential to go rancid. For this reason dl-alpha tocopherol is used as it’s an ‘in vitro’ antioxidant. Standard preparations contain only 0.1%, however, Natpro progesterone cream contains a further 0.2%.
The new two part emulsifier system… cetearyl olivate/sorbitan olivate – a unique natural PEG-free organic emulsifier from Olive oil. It reduces skin water loss, has a high moisturizing effect, is hypoallergenic and biomimics the skin.
The new natural preservative system… Aspen bark extract – is a natural organic preservative and as such is a unique discovery as it is an effective natural replacement for commonly used harmful chemical preservatives such as the ‘parabens’. It also improves the emollience (the ‘feel good’ factor) of the cream.
de-ionized water – this is a pure pharmaceutical grade standard .

Natpro safety

NATPRO SAFETY

Historically, progesterone (eg Natpro) and synthetic progestins have been lumped together with respect to their safety profiles, although they are very different in their molecular structure and effects.[This is discussed in the section on Bioidentical (Natural) Progesterone vs Synthetic Progestins.]

There is no documented evidence in the scientific literature of any cases of cancer as a result of treatment with bioidentical progesterone. Unfortunately, progesterone has been implicated in the development of breast cancer because of the results of large trials in which an increase in the incidence of breast cancer was seen when synthetic progestins were used in combination with estrogens for postmenopausal hormone therapy. These studies, such as the Women’s Health Initiative, DID NOT use bioidentical progesterone.

A large European study, on the other hand, found that women using bioidentical progesterone plus estrogen had a lower risk of breast cancer than women using estrogen alone, whereas women using synthetic progestins plus estrogen had a significantly higher risk of breast cancer. [See the section on Progesterone and Breast Health for the research on progesterone and breast cancer.]

With thanks to http://www.womeninbalance.org

Natural versus Synthetic Progesterone

NATURAL VERSUS SYNTHETIC

  • Confusion exists, even among leading experts in the field of hormone research, between the terms progesterone, progestin, and progestogen. Although these terms are often used interchangeably, they are not synonymous.

Until an authoritative definition is formally adopted, the following reflects the current culture of the usage of these terms, and clarifies how they are used by Women in Balance: “progesterone” refers to the hormone produced in the body, or produced from a plant source but still chemically and structurally identical to human progesterone, and it is therefore referred to as “bioidentical” or “natural”.

In contrast, “progestin” refers to a hormone that is synthetically produced and differs in structure from progesterone. There are numerous synthetic progestins used in hormone therapy, in contrast to only one molecule referred to as progesterone. “Progestogen” (sometimes spelled “progestagen”) is a general term for hormones that act like progesterone in the uterus, and therefore includes both progesterone and progestins.

There is increasing evidence that, by virtue of their different chemical structures, synthetic progestins do not always act as progesterone would at the same target tissues. This has long been understood with respect to treatment of pregnancy and fertility issues, when progesterone is effectively prescribed, yet synthetic progestins are contraindicated.

While synthetic progestins may mimic some of progesterone’s effects, progestins may react differently with progesterone receptors in the body. A significant consequence of the side effects seen with synthetic progestins has been an increase in the risk of developing breast cancer. Clinical trials such as the Women’s Health Initiative, in which more breast cancer was seen in the group taking progestins, did not study natural progesterone.

With thanks to http://www.womeninbalance.org

Cream, pill or gell?

CREAM PILL OR GEL

  • Historically dosed via injection, suppository, or troche, progesterone is now available in several additional delivery modes.

 

Of interest is the increase over the last decade in the delivery of hormones through the skin, with various effective modes of application including patches, creams, and gels.


Transdermal delivery of hormones has been found to be effective and well tolerated, with the additional benefit of bypassing the first-pass effect of the liver, allowing for reduced dosages as more of the hormone is directly available for its therapeutic effect rather than being mostly metabolized (see Hermannin our reference article here).

Micronization of progesterone in oral formulations has also benefited absorption, and some doctors prefer to prescribe oral micronized progesterone because of its tendency to induce drowsiness and thus aid sleep, which may help women who are troubled with night-time menopausal symptoms.

With thanks to http://www.womeninbalance.org

Progesterone Application Methods

 

Progesterone application methods

There are various method that can be used to deliver progesterone:

  • injections
  • subcutaneous implants
  • suppositories/pessaries
  • vaginal tablet
  • troches/lozenges
  • buccal drops
  • oral caps
  • gels

Injections are large and therefore painful. They generally contain peanut or sesame oil. The progesterone might crystallise out if the temperature drops too low, heating it gently will reverse this. Each injection is between 50-100mg.

Subcutaneous silastic capsules are implants made from a flexible, inert, non-biodegradable silicone elastomer. They can contain 20, 40, 110, or 220 mg of crystalline progesterone. They are characterised by an initial increase in serum hormone levels followed by a decline and then an apparent steady-state that persists from 7 to 24 days post-implant. More commonly they contain a progestin designed to last five years. Biodegradable systems are being developed, which dissolve in the body and do not require removal. Comprising poly(e-caprolactone) or a copolymer of caprolactone and trimethylenecarbonate.

Suppositories/pessaries are very effective, but limited in their application. The ingredients can contain a PEG emulsifier, silica gel, cocoa butter, glycerin, gelatine, water. PEG emulsifiers can contain dioxane, a known carcinogen. The dose ranges from 100mg to 200mg each.

Vaginal tablets are inserted via an applicator, and are also limited in their application. The ingredients can contain lactose monohydrate, polyvinylpyrrolidone, adipic acid, sodium bicarbonate, sodium lauryl sulfate, magnesium stearate, pregelatinized starch, and colloidal silicone dioxide. 100 mg vaginal tablet.

Troches/lozenges are affected by the destruction in the gut and liver, as about 50% is swallowed. Troches can be made from gelatine or a PEG (polyethylene glycol) based emulsifier. PEG emulsifiers can contain dioxane, a known carcinogen. They can contain artificial sweeteners, flavourants, acidulating agents, colourings and preservatives. Troches are a relatively new method of administering bio-identical hormones. The reasoning behind them is the hormone bypasses the stomach and first pass metabolism of the liver as it’s absorbed by the buccal mucosa, so entering circulation. Generally 100mg progesterone in each.

Buccal drops share the same fate as either oral or the troches, progesterone is very bitter, so not an option for most women. The progesterone is dissolved in oil, which may be vitamin E, peanut and sesame. Dose is dependant on the number of drops used.

Oral is the least effective route, as much of it is destroyed by the gut and liver. Some of the ingredients are peanut oil, gelatin, glycerin, lecithin, titanium dioxide and various colourants. The cap usually contains 100mg.

Gels are effective, but only used in the vagina. They are applied with a special applicator. The gel is bioadhesive, attaching to the lining of the vagina, accumulation can occur. The vaginal discharge appears as white globules. The ingredients can contain carbomer, phenoxyethanol, caprylyl glycol, sorbic acid, triethanolamine, polyacrylamide, C13-14 isoparaffin, laureth-7, glycerine, vegetable oil, methyl and propylparaben. Dose is dependant on the application, but in the region of 90mg.

Oil is an uncommon form of transdermal delivery, but a few exist as it obviates the need for preservatives. The progesterone might crystallise out if the temperature drops too low, heating it gently will reverse this. The oils may be coconut oil and caprylic/capric triglycerides. Dose is dependant on the amount used.

Creams are regarded by most as the best option. However, a word of caution… take care in reading the ingredients as they can contain harmful substances such as liquid paraffin, parabens, phenoxyethanol, sodium lauryl sulphate, propylene glycol, fragrances, artificial colours and PEG emulsifying waxes, these can contain dioxane, a known carcinogen.

The dose of progesterone is dependant on the amount of the cream used. The strength of the creams vary from 1.5% to 10%.

The progesterone in a cream is absorbed well, and has been found to be as effective as injections and to enter circulation rapidly. Creams have an advantage over all the other systems in that they can be used where and when they are needed…

On painful areas, particularly on the stomach for menstrual cramps, for migraines/headaches, in the vagina for dryness and inflammation or on piles, excellent for burns, on the face where it helps with wrinkles and more.

A progesterone cream can be used anywhere on the body, it does not have to be applied to the thin skinned areas only. The skin comprises 95% kerotinocytes, these have many progesterone receptor sites. Even hair follicles absorb progesterone well.

No special method or applicator is needed to apply a cream, there’s no discomfort in using it as in some delivery systems, in fact it often soothes the problem quickly. It can be applied within seconds, on the run if need be.

References

Build up

Gynecol Endocrinol. 2005 Aug;21(2):101-5 A study to look at hormonal absorption of progesterone cream used in conjunction with transdermal estrogen.

Creams and Gels

Menopause. 2005 Mar;12(2):232-7 Percutaneous administration of progesterone: blood levels and endometrial protection

Gynecological Endocrinology, Volume 18 , Issue 5May 2004 , pages 240 – 243 High local endometrial effect of vaginal progesterone gel

J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2002 Apr;80(4-5):449-55 Distribution and metabolism of topically applied progesterone in a rat model.

Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1999 Jun;180(6 Pt 1):1504-11 Percutaneous absorption of progesterone in postmenopausal women treated with transdermal estrogen

Face

Br J Dermatol. 2005 Sep;153(3):626-34 Effects and side-effects of 2% progesterone cream on the skin of peri- and postmenopausal women: results from a double-blind, vehicle-controlled, randomized study.

Fatty layer

Menopause. 12(2):232-237, March/April 2005 Percutaneous administration of progesterone: blood levels and endometrial protection.

Gels v Injections

Ther Clin Risk Manag. 2009; 5: 403-407 Luteal Phase Support in assisted reproductive technology treatment: focus on Endometrin® (progesterone) vaginal insert

Medical News Today Article Date: 16 Apr 2008 Vaginal Progesterone Is Equally Effective In Achieving Pregnancy Outcomes As Injectable Progesterone In Donor Egg Cycles

Gels v Tablet insert

Fertil Steril. 2009 Jul 14 Single and multidose pharmacokinetic study of a vaginal micronized progesterone insert (Endometrin) compared with vaginal gel in healthy reproductive-aged female subjects

High dose

European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology Volume 131, Issue 2, April 2007, Pages 182-188 A randomized comparison of side effects and patient convenience between Cyclogest® suppositories and Endometrin® tablets used for luteal phase support in IVF treatment

Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 2001; 80: 972?973 Substantial relief of myopathic disability by progesterone therapy (A study conducted in Austria found initially 400mg/day, followed a year later by 600mg/day, significantly improved the patients ability to walk. Hers was a very severe case though.)

Human Reproduction, Vol. 14, No. 3, 606-610, March 1999 Pharmacokinetics of natural progesterone administered in the form of a vaginal tablet

Human Reproduction, Vol. 14, No. 8, 1944-1948, August 1999 Luteal support with micronized progesterone following in-vitro fertilization using a down-regulation protocol with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist: a comparative study between vaginal and oral administration

Human Reproduction, Vol. 11, No. 10, pp. 2085-2089, 1996 Endocrinology: Luteal support after in-vitro fertilization: Crinone 8%, a sustained release vaginal progesterone gel, versus Utrogestan, an oral micronized progesterone

Maturitas. 1994 Dec; 20(2-3): 191-8 Endometrial hyperplasia: efficacy of a new treatment with a vaginal cream containing natural micronized progesterone

Human Reproduction, Vol. 8, No. 1, pp. 40-45, 1993 A prospective randomized study on oestradiol valerate supplementation in addition to intravaginal micronized progesterone in buserelin and HMG induced superovulation

Human Reproduction, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 168-175, 1992 A prospective randomized comparison of intramuscular or intravaginal natural progesterone as a luteal phase and early pregnancy supplement

Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 1991 May;35(1):61-8 Endometrial responses to various hormone replacement regimens in ovarian failure patients preparing for embryo donation.

Low dose

Gynecol Endocrinol. 2005 Aug;21(2):101-5 A study to look at hormonal absorption of progesterone cream used in conjunction with transdermal estrogen.

Metabolic pass

Expert Review of Obstetrics & Gynecology November 2006, Vol. 1, No. 2, Pages 173-182 Delivery routes of progesterone in assisted reproduction

Menopause. 12(2):232-237, March/April 2005 Percutaneous administration of progesterone: blood levels and endometrial protection

Human Reproduction Update, Vol.6, No.2 pp.139-148, 2000 Comparison between different routes of progesterone administration as luteal phase support in infertility treatments

Human Reproduction, Vol. 11, No. 10, pp. 2085-2089, 1996 Endocrinology: Luteal support after in-vitro fertilization: Crinone 8%, a sustained release vaginal progesterone gel, versus Utrogestan, an oral micronized progesterone

Oral

Expert Review of Obstetrics & Gynecology November 2006, Vol. 1, No. 2, Pages 173-182 Delivery routes of progesterone in assisted reproduction

Human Reproduction Update, Vol.6, No.2 pp.139-148, 2000 Comparison between different routes of progesterone administration as luteal phase support in infertility treatments

Human Reproduction, Vol. 5, No. 5, pp. 537-543, 1990 Effects of natural progesterone on the morphology of the endometrium in patients with primary ovarian failure

Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1983 October 29; 287(6401): 1241-1245 Dose dependent effects of oral progesterone on the oestrogenised postmenopausal endometrium

Skin

Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1999 Jun;180(6 Pt 1):1504-11 Percutaneous absorption of progesterone in postmenopausal women treated with transdermal estrogen

Speed of delivery

Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences 2006, Volume 66 Issue 12, Pages 1744 – 1748 Progesterone retention by rat uterus I: Pharmacokinetics after uterine intraluminal instillation

Human Reproduction, Vol. 14, No. 3, 606-610, March 1999 Pharmacokinetics of natural progesterone administered in the form of a vaginal tablet

Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1999 Jun;180(6 Pt 1):1504-11 Percutaneous absorption of progesterone in postmenopausal women treated with transdermal estrogen

Subcutaneous silastic capsules

World Health Organization, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland Long-acting hormonal contraceptive methods for women

Suppositories

Gynecol Obstet Invest 2004;58:105-108 Pharmacokinetics of Natural Progesterone Vaginal Suppository

Troches

Articles on Complementary Medicine The Truth about Troches

Uterus

Menopause. 12(2):232-237, March/April 2005 Percutaneous administration of progesterone: blood levels and endometrial protection.

Gynecological Endocrinology, Volume 18 , Issue 5May 2004 , pages 240 – 243 High local endometrial effect of vaginal progesterone gel

Obstetrics & Gynecology 2000;95:403-406 Direct Transport of Progesterone From Vagina to Uterus

Molecular and Cellular Biology, March 1999, p. 2251-2264, Vol. 19, No. 3 Progesterone Inhibits Estrogen-Induced Cyclin D1 and cdk4 Nuclear Translocation, Cyclin E- and Cyclin A-cdk2 Kinase Activation, and Cell Proliferation in Uterine Epithelial Cells in Mice

Human Reproduction, Vol. 14, No. 3, 606-610, March 1999 Pharmacokinetics of natural progesterone administered in the form of a vaginal tablet

Human Reproduction Update, Vol.5, No.4 pp.365-372, 1999 New Hypotheses. Transvaginal progesterone : evidence for a new functional ‘portal system’ flowing from the vagina to the uterus

Maturitas. 1994 Dec; 20(2-3): 191-8 Endometrial hyperplasia: efficacy of a new treatment with a vaginal cream containing natural micronized progesterone

Human Reproduction, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 168-175, 1992 A prospective randomized comparison of intramuscular or intravaginal natural progesterone as a luteal phase and early pregnancy supplement

Human Reproduction, Vol. 5, No. 5, pp. 537-543, 1990 Effects of natural progesterone on the morphology of the endometrium in patients with primary ovarian failure

Coming off HRT

COMING OFF HRT

 

Coming off HRT drugs, oestrogen only, progestin only and testosterone

 

It is safe to come off HRT drugs cold turkey, unlike many drugs, but symptoms can come back.

It is far gentler on the body to reduce the HRT slowly, always using the progesterone whilst doing so. The progesterone normally counteracts any withdrawal symptoms if this route is followed. It’s best to use the progesterone for at least a month before attempting to reduce the HRT dose.

Start with 100mg/day (3ml or just over 1/2 teaspoon) of Natpro and use it continuously, there’s no need for a break. A higher amount might be needed if HRT has been used for many years. If symptoms come back while reducing, increase the amount of progesterone and slow down the HRT reduction. as this can occur when first using progesterone.

Start with 100-200mg/day progesterone for the first month. Use it continuously, there is no need for a break. A higher amount might be needed if HRT has been used for many years, or if oestrogen dominance occurs. Please see this web page on oestrogen dominance, as this can occur when first using progesterone.

Once the oestrogen dominance symptoms have settled down, continue on the progesterone, but start reducing the HRT. If symptoms come back while reducing, increase the amount of progesterone and slow down the HRT reduction. A high amount of progesterone normally overcomes this.

Follow the instructions below when reducing your dose of HRT, oestrogen or progestin

  • Miss 1 day
  • Take 7 days
  • Miss 1 day
  • Take 6 days
  • Miss 1 day
  • Take 5 days
  • Miss 1 day
  • Take 4 days
  • Miss 1 day
  • Take 3 days
  • Miss 1 day
  • Take 2 days
  • Miss 1 day
  • Take 1 day

You have now reduced the dose by 50% over 35 days. Continue missing alternate days until you feel secure, then work back up the list above i.e…

  • Miss 2 days
  • Take 1 day
  • Miss 3 days
  • Take 1 day etc

This could take about three months. If no symptoms have returned and you feel fine, discontinue the HRT.

 

  • Hot flushes/flashes

 

There is evidence that it could be a drop in serotonin levels during peri-menopause and menopause which could cause hot flushes. If progesterone is not helping sufficiently (this raises levels of serotonin) then take the amino acid tryptophan which is the precursor to serotonin.

Tryptophan is low in depression, insomnia, anxiety, OCD, a slow gut leading to constipation, a stomach in knots, IBS, aches and pains (including fibromyalgia), hot flushes, a tight chest and more. It helps stabilise blood sugar as it’s involved with appetite control. Often a sharp drop in blood sugar causes depression/anxiety. This drop can also cause a hot flush. Studies have found tryptophan helps with these. Serotonin is the precursor to melatonin our sleep hormone, so supplementing with tryptophan helps with insomnia.

Start with 250mg/day at night only and away from food, particularly protein. Tryptophan needs an insulin spike to push it into the brain, so take with about 1/4 glass of fruit juice or a biscuit, half an hour to an hour before bed.

It also needs the vitamin co-factors B6 and folic acid to convert it into serotonin, so if the tryptophan doesn’t come mixed with B6 and folic acid, take 25mg B6 and 300mcg folic acid with it. Increase the dose slowly in 250mg increments until you find the optimum dose.

If you find you wake during the night, have another dose ready by your bedside, together with some juice. Take it upon waking, without getting out of bed. You should drop off to sleep soon after. It is safe to go up to 6000mg/day.

How to use Natpro

 

  • How to use progesterone cream Natpro

 

Rub the required amount of cream thoroughly into the skin on any part of the body.

Important note for women… If you have been on HRT (hormone replacement therapy) or have a naturally high level of estrogen, progesterone will make you more sensitive to the estrogen in your body. Because of this, for the first two or three months the symptoms caused by excessive estrogen may affect you. If this is the case it is advisable to increase the daily application of progesterone cream, with the advice of your health specialist, until these symptoms have gone.

The main symptoms of excessive estrogen are…

  • breast tenderness
  • bloating/weight gain from water retention
  • spotting or a temporary reappearance of your periods
  • headaches/migraines/dizziness
  • heart palpitations
  • hypoglycemia
  • aches and pains or bruising
  • depression
  • tiredness/chronic fatigue
  • hot flushes
  • mood swings
  • anger
  • skin problems
  • nausea

Before using any progesterone cream it is important to read this page first…

 

  • ‘Estrogen Dominance’

 

If you are on HRT and wish to discontinue it, the gentlest course is to taper off taking the pills/patches/inserts over a period of 2-6 months. Adjust the tapering off period according to the severity of previous symptoms and how long the HRT was taken. See here for full details… (Coming off HRT coming soon)

Natpro how much to use

 

  • How Much Progesterone Cream to Use

 

The cream can be used at any time of the day and, if preferred, on more than one occasion, but no less than twice a day, as progesterone levels drop after about 13 hours.

It can be applied to any part of the body and does not have to be used only on the thin skinned areas as is sometimes recommended. The skin comprises 95% kerotinocytes, which have a plentiful supply of progesterone receptors, even the hair follicles absorb it well.

Please note the amount suggested is a guide only as each individual is different. It’s only by trial and error that the correct amount is found. Another point to remember is that stress drops progesterone levels sharply so apply more to prevent the return of symptoms.

Progesterone should always be used dependant on symptoms and not on ‘dose’. If symptoms are severe more will be needed, if mild then less.

Generally between 100-200mg/day of progesterone (that is 3ml to 6ml of cream) is needed.

Please note… The figures below showing quantities of progesterone cream are based on a concentration of 3.33% progesterone as is the case with a 2oz (60 gram) tube of Natpro cream containing 2000mg (2 grams) of progesterone.

 

  • Women dosage of progesterone cream

 

    1. Menstruating
      • if a cycle is present apply the cream twice daily from ovulation for the next 14 days, bleeding should occur within a day or two. The luteal phase is always 12-14 days in all women, any less and it’s known as a ‘defective luteal phase’ Cycles vary from 21 days to 36 days. For instance in a 21 day cycle the cream should be used from day 8 for 14 days, if a 28 day cycle from day 15 for 14 days, and if a 36 day cycle from day 22 for 14 days
    2. Peri or post Menopausal, Hysterectomy, Oophorectomy, Pre-pubertal, Pubertal
      • if there is no cycle, or an erratic one too difficult to follow, apply the cream twice daily. There is no need for a break as some suggest, although some women prefer to have one. Either is fine.
    3. Severe symptoms
      • hot flushes Use at least 400mg/day for 4-5 days, this generally stops them. It’s best to apply the cream hourly
      • heavy, continual bleeding 400-600mg/day from 1 to 3 months, ignoring the cycle. When the bleeding has stopped, slowly reduce the cream until bleeding occurs again, then discontinue the cream for 14 days. Then start again from day 15 for 14 days. Over the coming months the natural cycle length will assert itself. It’s best to apply the cream hourly

 

  • a multitude of bad symptoms Use a minimum of 200mg/day following the cycle, more might be needed. If symptoms return during the break, then continue applying the cream twice daily or more frequently until they resolve. Once they have then begin following the cycle again.
  • Men dosage of progesterone cream

 

Use from 10 to 100mg/day of progesterone (that is 0.3ml to 3 ml of cream). It’s best applied twice a day.

  • 1 ml (1/5th tsp) of Natpro cream contains 33.3mg of progesterone
  • 2ml (2/5th tsp) contains 66.6mg of progesterone
  • 3ml (3/5th tsp) contains 100mg of progesterone
  • 4ml (4/5th tsp) contains 133.2mg progesterone
  • 5ml (1tsp) contains 166.5mg progesterone
  • 1/8th teaspoon (0.625ml) contains 20.8mg progesterone
  • 1/4tsp (1.25ml) contains 41.6mg
  • 1/2tsp (2.5ml) contains 83.2mg
  • 3/4tsp (3.75ml) contains 124.8mg progesterone
  • 1tsp (5ml) contains 166.5mg progesterone

1ml (1/5th tsp) will cover both feet and both legs, or both arms, stomach and breasts.

Progesterone absorption

 

  • How to best absorb progesterone

 

A good skin cream (such as Natpro) is the most user friendly of all the ways progesterone can be taken. Oral progesterone is a waste as 80-90% is destroyed in the digestive system and liver. Injections are inconvenient and painful. Buccal drops or pills are very bitter and suppositories are not much fun!

The cream can be applied anywhere… in the vagina or nose for dryness, on piles or painful, achy or itchy areas. Its the best thing for burns and wonderful on the face and elsewhere.

All the successful studies done on progesterone use between 100mg to 200mg per day. This equates to 3ml to 6ml of Natpro per day. Some authorities suggest as high as 400-600mg/day. Orally administered forms need 5 to 10 times as much to compensate for the digestive losses. The cream is best applied twice a day, to keep levels up

This article written with thanks to http://www.progesteronetherapy.com